Remarkable data.

It is interesting to see the author of the paper keep up the alarmism despite statements like this:
“Time periods with less than twice the modern global ice volume show almost no indications of sea-level rise faster than about 2 metres per century. Those with close to the modern amount of ice on Earth, show rates of up to 1 to 1.5 metres per century.”

Co-author Professor Eelco Rohling, of both the University of Southampton and ANU, explains that the study also sheds light on the timescales of change. He says: “For the first time, we have data from a sufficiently large set of events to systematically study the timescale over which ice-sheet responses developed from initial change to maximum retreat.”

“This happened within 400 years for 68 per cent of all 120 cases considered, and within 1100 years for 95 per cent. In other words, once triggered, ice-sheet reduction (and therefore sea-level rise) kept accelerating relentlessly over periods of many centuries.”
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That sounds to me like it is outside the bounds of reasonable expectations to think that our current world configuration could lead to a circumstance of over one meter rise per century. It certainly seems to me that people are smart enough to deal with that. Plus there is the fact that sea level change rates are constant or declining while we’ve taken good measurements.

Mostly, there is nothing happening on earth in the industrial age that has not happened many times before, before humans could possibly had anything to do with it.

Watts Up With That?

post-glacial_sea_level-incl-3-mm-yr-1-trendFrom the University of Southampton

Land-ice decay at the end of the last five ice-ages caused global sea-levels to rise at rates of up to 5.5 metres per century, according to a new study.

An international team of researchers developed a 500,000-year record of sea-level variability, to provide the first account of how quickly sea-level changed during the last five ice-age cycles.

The results, published in the latest issue of Nature Communications, also found that more than 100 smaller events of sea-level rise took place in between the five major events.

Dr Katharine Grant, from the Australian National University (ANU), Canberra, who led the study, says: “The really fast rates of sea-level rise typically seem to have happened at the end of periods with exceptionally large ice sheets, when there was two or more times more ice on the Earth than today.

“Time periods with less than twice the…

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