Archives for the month of: November, 2014


EPA, the most dangerous thing on earth.
Don’t forget that we live in the cleanest environment in over a century, even according to EPA’s own data. We are not fouling our nest. At this point, we are just harming the poorest among us. Stop the EPA.

Watts Up With That?

Gruber Gruber

Accumulation of fraudulent EPA regulations impacts energy, economy, jobs, families and health

Guest essay by Paul Driessen

Call it the Gruberization of America’s energy and environmental policies.

Former White House medical consultant Jonathan Gruber pocketed millions of taxpayer dollars before infamously explaining how ObamaCare was enacted. “Lack of transparency is a huge political advantage,” he said. “It was really, really critical to getting the bill passed.” At least one key provision was a “very clever basic exploitation of the lack of economic understanding of the American voter.”

The Barack Obama/Gina McCarthy Environmental Protection Agency is likewise exploiting its lack of transparency and most Americans’ lack of scientific understanding. EPA bureaucrats and their hired scientists, pressure groups and PR flacks are getting rich and powerful by implementing costly, punitive, dictatorial regulations “for our own good,” and pretending to be honest and publicly spirited.

EPA’s latest regulatory onslaught is its “Clean…

View original post 1,262 more words

Advertisements

A friend posted on Facebook about OpenWorm. Cool. It is not a new concept, but apparently we are finally doing it. Start a model at the most basic level, and work up.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenWorm

And look at this (don’t freak out):

http://www.openworm.org/

Not a lot there, but it is the source; it’s where you go. It mostly says they are trying to recreate life digitally. That is, we will be able to run life simulations in the computer, and more importantly, we will be able to make robots that are as autonomous as the lifeforms they replicate. Scary, sure, but cool.

Remember, what can be done will be done. Let’s make sure we do it right.

Fundamentally, our models will never be very good until they are built from the base up. So this is a good and necessary start. Further, we will never well model the weather and climate. It is too complex to start at the bottom, too many factors to track and calculate. Even if we had sufficient computational capacity, we just couldn’t replicate the entire system well enough to be better than the approximates we already use, and we need to remember that such models are inadequate and always will be.


Sometimes we must treat symptoms, but the cure comes by identifying and treating the problem.

readingdoc

One of my special “thank-yous” this year has to be for my husband’s recovery from a heart attack and triple by-pass surgery in August. The heart attack was totally unexpected because he seemed very healthy except for some back problems and a few other minor complaints. Besides that, since he had a pacemaker put in several years ago, he has been under the care of a cardiologist who did regular exams including stress tests. He always passed with flying colors, and the doctor commented that he hoped he would be in as good a shape when he got to my husband’s age (72, in case you’re wondering). So it was quite a shock when the doctor came out of the heart cath lab on that August day to tell us that my husband was literally a ticking time bomb and needed immediate surgery.

I will be eternally grateful (1) that…

View original post 622 more words


Willis’ stories are good.

Watts Up With That?

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach

With Thanksgiving coming up, I thought I’d write about something other than science. A few weekends ago, I went by kayak across Tomales Bay from Marshall to Lairds Landing, where I lived for nine months or so when I was about twenty-five with a wonderful friend and his lady and their son. It had been fifteen years since I was last there, I’d gone for the wake not long after my friend died. I went on this trip with a long-time shipmate of mine, a gifted artist, builder, and blacksmith.

Now, there are lots of words for the gradations of friendship—friends, acquaintances, work-mates, BFFs, room-mates, colleagues, and the like. “Shipmate” means more than any of those to me. It means someone who I’ve been through some storms with at sea.

A shipmate is a relationship based on the fact that at sea, when I go…

View original post 3,563 more words

BioLogos has reposted this article by Denis Alexander which I must have missed last year. Dr. Alexander has several articles at BioLogos, and in this one he discusses why religion and philosophy are so important to science and facts.

While our genetics determine much about us, our genes do NOT determine who we are. Our choices are much more important to who we are and who we become. We are free moral agents, and we always have the ability to choose to do what is right.

Enjoy Dr. Alexander’s article: http://biologos.org/blog/made-in-the-image-of-god-human-values-and-genomics2

For millennia it was uniquely the pharaoh or the king who was seen as being in the “image of a god” in the polytheistic political systems of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia. Adad-shum-ussur, a court astrologer and cultic official in the seventh century B.C. royal court of Nineveh, made clear that the Assyrian king Esarhaddon is the very image of Bel (Marduk), the top god of that era:

A (free) man is as the shadow of god, the slave is as the shadow of a (free) man; but the king, he is like unto the (very) image of god.

That understanding is very significant. The ancient perception is still among us. We really do not see ourselves as truly free. We do not see ourselves created in the image of God, but in some shadow form that exists mostly as a slave. No, it is not just the king, not just the emperor, not even the President. It is all of you. We are all created like God, knowing both good and evil. Each, always, with the ability to do good, or to not. Each with the ability to realize our own destiny.

This whole last bit of the article is worth repeating:

Then God said, “Let us make adam [humankind] in our image, in our likeness, and let them rule over the fish of the sea and the birds of the air, over the livestock, over all the earth, and over all the creatures that move along the ground.” So God created adam in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them. [Genesis 1:26-27].

In its historical context, the implications were revolutionary: the kingly and priestly male roles previously allocated to the privileged few by a pantheon of gods were now being delegated instead by the one creator God to the whole of humanity, male and female. In a stroke the entire ruling and priestly structure of Mesopotamian society was delegitimized. The Imago Dei was being democratized and it was now humankind who were to be the significant players in the arena of earthly life, the mandate to rule underlying their new responsibilities. Above all, humanity was set free by the one true God to determine their own destiny, no longer under the yoke of all-powerful dictators, nor under the baleful astrological control of the moon and stars.

Yet, ever since, humans have become experts at re-enslaving themselves, refusing the responsibilities that come with free-choice and submitting instead to narratives of fate and destiny. It seems ironic that today it is not the creation myths of ancient Babylon but the ideological interpretations of biology that provide the narratives of fate, in which genes “pull” humans toward certain political views and people cannot change their minds because their convictions are “rooted in their physiology.”

“It’s in his or her DNA” is a new phrase becoming increasingly embedded in our language, referring to something that cannot apparently be changed. On Sept. 8, 2012, Brad Pitt was quoted by the Daily Mail as saying that “America is a country founded on guns. It’s in our DNA. It’s very strange but I feel better having a gun.” No it’s not in our DNA, Mr. Pitt, either literally or metaphorically. People have choices — they are the prisoners neither of their genetics, nor of their physiology, nor indeed of their environments. Human beings made in the image of God are free to chart their own destiny in a way that preserves human value and dignity. On that we can leave the last word to Abraham Lincoln: “…nothing stamped with the Divine image and likeness was sent into the world to be trodden on, and degraded, and imbruted by its fellows” (Aug. 17, 1858).

I must emphasize Lincoln: “…nothing stamped with the Divine image and likeness was sent into the world to be trodden on, and degraded, and imbruted by its fellows.

It really isn’t that hard. We are each free. I stand before God the same as all others. I answer for myself, myself alone, to Him, to Him alone.

http://biblehub.com/esv/romans/14.htm

4Who are you to pass judgment on the servant of another? It is before his own mastera that he stands or falls. And he will be upheld, for the Lord is able to make him stand. http://biblehub.com/romans/14-4.htm (The individual verses include the selected commentary notes.)

If we recognize each person individually, if we see each of us “stamped with the Divine image and likeness”, then we cannot treat each other wrongly. We cannot try to rule over or coerce. We will walk in freedom and responsibility, and we will acknowledge, “Life is tough, but it’s tougher if you’re stupid.” If we remember that we all suffer and we all die young, it is a little easier to keep things in perspective.

Just remember, He hath shewed thee, O man, what is good; and what doth the LORD require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?

http://www.es.flinders.edu.au/~mattom/science+society/index.html

Perceptions are rarely accurate. Just for reference.

This reference provides a bit of clarification regarding life in the Americas before the Europeans came.

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/10/29/science/don-t-blame-columbus-for-all-the-indians-ills.html?pagewanted=all

It mostly says the native Americans suffered from urbanization.

This paper has more information.

http://opr.princeton.edu/seminars/SteckelF04.pdf

Good stuff here: http://www.es.flinders.edu.au/~mattom/science+society/lecture18.html


Lynas is about as greenie as people get. His point is spot on.

Watts Up With That?

qotw_croppedBarry woods writes in with this interesting and surprising quote, that says quite a lot about the value of the viewpoint of climate skeptics:

From Mark Lynas – India’s Coal conundrum – Which comes first the climate or the poor, and he cites GWPF in that quote! (heresy)

To be poor is to be vulnerable, even in today’s climate. The fact that only ‘climate sceptics’ tend make this point currently is somewhat shameful. – Mark Lynas

Source: http://www.marklynas.org/2014/11/indias-coal-conundrum-which-comes-first-the-climate-or-the-poor/

View original post

http://biblehub.com/nasb/philippians/3.htm

7But whatever things were gain to me, those things I have counted as loss for the sake of Christ. 8More than that, I count all things to be loss in view of the surpassing value of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord, for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and count them but rubbish so that I may gain Christ, 9and may be found in Him, not having a righteousness of my own derived from the Law, but that which is through faith in Christ, the righteousness which comes from God on the basis of faith, 10that I may know Him and the power of His resurrection and the fellowship of His sufferings, being conformed to His death;11in order that I may attain to the resurrection from the dead.

http://biblehub.com/esv/2_corinthians/4.htm

16So we do not lose heart. Though our outer selfd is wasting away, our inner self is being renewed day by day. 17For this light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison, 18as we look not to the things that are seen but to the things that are unseen. For the things that are seen are transient, but the things that are unseen are eternal.

Some have it harder than others, but this applies to each of us equally.


This is what the President agreed to for China.

Watts Up With That?

By Paul Homewood

News from Enerdata that China has published a new Energy Development Strategy Action Plan (2014-2020), presumably following on from the US-China agreement last week.

The State Council of China has unveiled a new Energy Development Strategy Action Plan (2014-2020) focusing on the development of renewables and capping primary energy consumption at 4.8 Gtce/year until 2020, i.e. limiting the primary energy consumption growth rate to 3.5%/year until 2020. China aims to limit coal consumption to 4.2 Gt/year until 2020, a 16% increase over the 2013 consumption level of 3.6 Gt. China will also target a reduction of coal in the primary energy mix to under 62% by 2020, to the advantage of non-fossil fuels (15% by 2020 and 20% by 2030, from about 10% in 2013) and gas (10% by 2020). By 2020, the installed nuclear power capacity is expected to reach 58 GW, with an additional 30…

View original post 633 more words


For me, there is no clearer example of the fact that windmills are a failure than T. Boone Pickens, who put his money where his mouth is, and he changed his mind. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickens_Plan He says he lost two billion dollars on it. http://www.forbes.com/sites/christopherhelman/2014/03/31/t-boone-reborn/ When it hurts, you change your mind. Sooner or later, the level of pain with windmills will be too high for society to bare. Then we will abandon them again, and someone will have to deal with the mess.

STOP THESE THINGS

vestas_turbine_chabanet_burns Another of Vesta’s leading “lights” ….

Here’s a great little take on the great wind power fraud from the US.

Twenty Bad Things About Wind Energy, and Three Reasons Why
By John Droz, Jr. — October 24, 2012

Editor note: This is an updated version of a previous post at MasterResource: “Wind Spin: Misdirection and Fluff by a Taxpayer-enabled Industry” which was itself an update of Fifteen Bad Things About Wind Energy, and Three Reasons Why,” one of the two most read posts in the history of MasterResource.

Trying to pin down the arguments of wind promoters is a bit like trying to grab a greased balloon. Just when you think you’ve got a handle, it morphs into a different shape and escapes your grasp. Let’s take a quick highlight review of how things have evolved with wind merchandising.

1 – Wind energy was abandoned well over…

View original post 2,882 more words


The only point, volcanoes are not nearly as important as we assume them to be.

Watts Up With That?

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach

Well, we haven’t had a game of “Spot The Volcano” in a while, so I thought I’d take a look at what is likely the earliest volcanic eruption for which we have actual temperature records. This was the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Laki in June of 1783. It is claimed to have caused a very cold winter in 1783-1784. A study of the effects (see end notes) says:

… the 1783-1784 winter was extremely cold and snowy around the circum-North Atlantic. European temperatures were ~2°C below average for the late 1700s, and it was among the coldest winters in Central England …

Well dang … that sounds pretty scary. However, being a naturally suspicious fellow, I thought I’d take a look and see just what the temperatures actually said. I found eight records in the Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature dataset that went back that far, there…

View original post 570 more words


The Pointman, across the Atlantic, knows US politics better than we do.

Pointman's

The mid-term elections in America are over and the big winner is the Republican party who’ve taken control of both houses of congress. There are a number of conclusions to be drawn from the results.

The big one is that once you get past the media’s continuing love affair with the concept of a Barack Obama, the majority of Americans are deeply disillusioned with him. The perception and the reality is that he and his administration don’t actually do anything. They’re like rabbits paralysed in the headlights of whatever crisis is currently bearing down on them.

In the absence of any type of New Deal policy to get people back to work, the economy is still scraping along not far above the bottom and places like Detroit, which used to be the pounding heart of manufacturing America, are imploding down to fractions of their former populations. If you’re a working man and just…

View original post 875 more words


Mr. Budline, got anything we more technical information? I see a link in the comments to a presentation of the good doctor’s. I will look into that.

Thanks for the good interview. I enjoyed, and I’m hoping there is more to come.

Watts Up With That?

Will-Happer
Paul Budline writes:
This past Tuesday I took my camera to Princeton University to conduct an interview with physicist Will Happer, whose work you probably know. This is a 4-minute video I put together after that interview, which I hope you’ll find interesting. I should be clear that no money or anything else exchanged hands, although Dr. Happer did buy me a cup of coffee.

View original post

%d bloggers like this: