Worthwhile article. The science isn’t settled. Science never is.

The lead graphic and first sentence are laughably inconsistent. The graphic states that it depicts what earth will look like with 6000 millimeters of increased average sea level. Not scary by itself. Not scary at all when considering that sea level is currently measured to be rising at about 3 millimeters per year. Accordingly, a linear extrapolation gets us out 2000 years hence.

Looking around the internet for examples of old photos that can show sea level, and current photos of the same location can provide as many examples as you care to review. One cannot tell that significant change is occurring overall. We aren’t talking about flooding cities. Sooner or later coasts change. Some coastal locations will go under water, others will have the ocean shore recede. Sooner or later everywhere changes. England has locations lost to the sea, and landlocked villages that used to be on the seashore. And that is just on that small island.

Everything changes. Always has. Always will.

It is also important to note that alarmists spin the rate of sea level rise. They like to claim that the current sea level rise rate of 3 mm per year is three time more than in the recent past. First, they are comparing apples and oranges. Second, that is playing fast and loose with the known facts. It is most practical to say that the sea level rise rate has been between one and three millimeters per year for thousands of years, all of our historical past. There really is no practical way to be afraid of something continuing to happen that has, for practical purposes, always happened.

Watts Up With That?

Study suggests that global sea level is less sensitive to high atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations than previously thought.

From STANFORD’S SCHOOL OF EARTH, ENERGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Ice sheets may be more resilient than thought, say Stanford scientists

This is a map of the Earth with a 6-meter sea level rise represented in red. A new Stanford study says that the sea level rise associated with a warming world may not be as high as predicted. CREDIT NASA This is a map of the Earth with a 6-meter sea level rise represented in red. A new Stanford study says that the sea level rise associated with a warming world may not be as high as predicted. CREDIT NASA

Sea level rise poses one of the biggest threats to human systems in a globally warming world, potentially causing trillions of dollars’ worth of damages to flooded cities around the world. As surface temperatures rise, ice sheets are melting at record rates and sea levels are rising.

But there may be some good news amid the worry. Sea levels may not rise as high as assumed.

To predict sea level changes, scientists look to…

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