I received a flyer from Ms. Mena Samara for Oklahoma County Clerk.

There are no primary races for the Democratic or Libertarian primaries this summer.

The Republicans have two besides Ms. Samara. Ms. Linda Amick Dodson, and Mr. Rick Warren.

Two of those names were just voted on a couple of months ago. The clerk position came open, and we had a special election. Ms. Dodson is in the Oklahoma County Clerk’s office, and she ran a good race. Mr. Warren edged her out though, and then he won the general (special) election for the abbreviated term. So, he is up again, and he has the two challengers.

To be clear, I enthusiastically support the right to ignore the voting booth. If you don’t want to vote, okay. If you want to go and leave a given block blank, I support you. That is our right just as much as to cast the ballot. Either way, we are free. Frankly, in the system as it is now, not voting is probably more important than voting. Either way, I hope you have looked into it and made an informed decision. I encourage all to evaluate the choices available and decide, then act. I hope you don’t just muddle through and find yourself in the ballot booth with no idea what you are looking at, or waking up Wednesday morning realizing you just hadn’t bothered. Life in general, and voting in particular, is worth some effort. Think it through and decide and act.

Mr. Warren has the following description of the Clerk office on his page.

The Oklahoma County Court Clerk presides over the largest, and busiest, Court Clerk’s office in the state. Approximately 120,000 new court cases are filed in Oklahoma County annually, more than any other state, local or federal court in Oklahoma.

The Oklahoma County Court Clerk’s primary duty is to record and maintain court records filed in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma. From the inception of the office until 2002, records were maintained almost entirely in paper form. That year, the first ever document imaging process began, with approximately one-third of the county’s case files being electronically recorded. The large majority of records kept by the Court Clerk are open for public inspection.

Another important duty of the Oklahoma County Court Clerk is to collect and account for all funds deposited in connection with court proceedings. The Oklahoma County Court Clerk’s office annually receives more than $60 million in criminal fines, court costs, bond forfeitures, child support and other such payments. Fiscal oversight of Court Clerk funds is provided by the Supreme Court, the State Treasurer, the State Auditor, the County Treasurer, by internal audit staff and the dozens of government entities to which the Court Clerk transmits funding.

Other services provided by the Oklahoma County Court Clerk’s office include passport processing; marriage licenses; and licensing of private process servers and low point beer providers.

It is a significant public position.

I’m glad we seem to have three well qualified candidates.

Mr. Warren gives some sound files worth hearing. He’s only been in office long enough to get started, but I can’t find complaints. So far, so good.

Ms. Dodson certainly has the experience, and she seems to have the mindset and attention to detail that would keep her successful in the position.

Interesting news note on Ms. Samara’s current occupation at the link.

My hope for the county, our courts and all the county offices, is that we simplify.

From the 120,000 cases per year information above, that is 10,000 per month, which works out at over 460 cases per day (work days). That is practically a case a minute. Really?

Do we need to have so much going in our county that legally requires government involvement?

That doesn’t even count the city or the fed. It is all such a waste.

At least we can pretend we are free when we consider voting, right?

We need less government. We need fewer laws. We need much less regulation.

I wonder if I can get one or more of these candidates to commit to such reductions?

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