Sometimes it’s good to admit the fact mother nature is a bitch. She don’t care. She doesn’t care about flowers. She doesn’t care about rocks. She doesn’t care about dogs. She doesn’t care about tigers. She doesn’t care about sharks either. She doesn’t care about you and me or even our babies. She doesn’t even care about cute little kittens.

Mostly, she can’t care. She only works with energy. When energy builds up and becomes unbalanced, mother nature finds ways to dissipate it, sooner or later.

As Galileo said, “Eppur si muove.” The earth moves. It constantly shifts from energy input from the motion of the core. The energy input builds in faults and hard places, and the softer places move variously. Gradually, the energy buildup is stronger than whatever it is built up in, and things break and move rather suddenly.

This map indicates the movement: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthquake#/media/File:Global_plate_motion_2008-04-17.jpg

Here is an informative map of where the build-ups and breaks occur: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthquake#/media/File:Quake_epicenters_1963-98.png

Wiki has a nice overview: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthquake

The central US has its share of faults. The big one, the monster, is in the Missouri boot heel: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Madrid_Seismic_Zone. And Missouri’s own take on it: https://dnr.mo.gov/geology/geosrv/geores/techbulletin1.htm. Consider this summary of major faults in North America: http://blog.esurance.com/beyond-san-andreas-5-scariest-fault-lines-in-the-u-s/

Comments about faults: https://www2.usgs.gov/faq/categories/9838/3399. It is noteworthy that central US movement is slower than the west coast, and things take longer to build up, and can go quite quiet for long periods.

Oklahomans, learn something about the ground under your feet. Go here: http://www.ou.edu/ogs/. Loads of information to download as PDF books. Good source for teachers.

The earthquake that woke up nearly everyone in the central US this morning is reported by OK Geo as: 12:02:44.426999 36.425 +/- 0.4 -96.929 +/- 0.5 5.6 +/- 1.2 5.5 MW OGS

That was 07:03 CDT. Google puts that in the middle of nowhere between state highways 18 and 177, north of state highway 15, south of the Arkansas River. Pawnee County, in the vicinity of Sooner Lake, which is in Pawnee and Noble counties. https://www.google.com/maps/place/36%C2%B025’30.0%22N+96%C2%B055’44.4%22W/@36.4198352,-96.9786396,14980m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:0x0!8m2!3d36.425!4d-96.929

Of course, not everyone felt it. Some of that is just attributable to individuality in person and circumstance, but some of it is attributable to the nature and variability of the ground and rock under our feet. Some spots shook a little, some a lot. Here is a representation from USGS: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us10006jxs#map. Relatives from Kansas City contacted us about the quake, when they felt it.

It was big, and shook a lot, but some spots are quite where shaking seems likely, and other spots shake far away, while areas around didn’t notice. The vibrations transmit as far and as wide as possible until the energy of the quake is used up and absorbed into the softer, looser, ground.

Check this article indicating significant earthquake potential in much of Oklahoma. http://strangesounds.org/2013/07/fault-lines-in-the-usa-this-map-shows-the-major-earthquake-hazard-areas-within-the-united-states.html

Here is a good one, which says, “Earthquakes are occurring in the basement
below oil and gas activities.” http://www.searchanddiscovery.com/documents/2016/70211boak/ndx_boak.pdf The USGS is making the case that the injection wells matter. They admit they really don’t understand yet. They also note that we’ve been doing this for decades, and it only just now seems to matter. In my opinion, oil/gas/water activities are only altering the way the quakes happen. Mother nature sets the stress, and she relieves it. She doesn’t care how. Our activities alter the how, not the amount.

Here ya go: http://strangesounds.org/2016/09/m5-6-earthquake-in-oklahoma-felt-across-entire-midwest-north-dakota-to-houston-texas.html

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