Archives for category: Quote
Lawrence Reed, quoting Tocqueville,
“Even despots accept the excellence of liberty. The simple truth is that they wish to keep it for themselves and promote the idea that no one else is at all worthy of it. Thus, our opinion of liberty does not reveal our differences but the relative value which we place on our fellow man. We can state with conviction, therefore, that a man’s support for absolute government is in direct proportion to the contempt he feels for his country” — Alexis de Tocqueville, 1858.
Don’t you agree?
 
“Thus, our opinion of liberty does not reveal our differences but the relative value which we place on our fellow man.”
 
Isn’t it that simple?
 
“We can state with conviction, therefore, that a man’s support for absolute government is in direct proportion to the contempt he feels for his country””
 
Yes! The less willing you are to let your fellow citizens alone, the more you contempt you have for them and the more you distrust the people of your country.
 
Like Thomas Jefferson said, “I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.”
 
Forcing people by forcing the armed police to force them leads to all kinds of troubles, all kinds of harm. While it is inconvenient to trust people, since they will so often fail, it does show our love, respect, and patriotism.
 
It is worth it.
Liberty is worth the effort. Every person is worth it, every single person on earth, born or unborn, native or immigrant, legal or otherwise, wise or foolish, healthy or infirm, rich or poor, talented or plain, gifted or needy, yes, every single person!
Mr. Reed ends his statement with the following:
See Jim Powell’s essay, “Alexis de Tocqueville: How People Gain Liberty and Lose It” here: http://bit.ly/211zP8I. Tocqueville warned that a welfare state could seduce people into servitude.

“The practical reason for freedom is that freedom seems to be the only condition under which any kind of substantial moral fiber can be developed. We have tried law, compulsion and authoritarianism of various kinds, and the result is nothing to be proud of” — Albert Jay Nock, 1925.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Jay_Nock

https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Albert_Jay_Nock

https://mises.org/profile/albert-jay-nock

 

“Let us always remember that he does not really believe his own opinion, who dares not give free scope to his opponent.” Wendell Phillips

“It is the mark of an instructed mind to rest satisfied with the degree of precision which the nature of the subject permits and not to seek an exactness where only an approximation of the truth is possible.” – Aristotle

Faith in reason is the trust that the ultimate natures of things lie together in a harmony which excludes mere arbitrariness. It is the faith that at the base of things we shall not find mere arbitrary mystery. The faith in the order of nature which made possible the growth of science is a particular example of a deeper faith. — Alfred North Whitehead (British mathematician-philosopher), Science and the Modern World, Free Press, NewYork, 1967 (originally published 1925), available at Google books.

(Snagged from http://www.sciencemeetsreligion.org/)

Do no harm.

John Wesley said that after he asked, “How is it with your sou? How is your walk with God?”

I hurt someone this week. I didn’t mean to. That doesn’t make hurt any less for either of us.

I am determined, and I work to ever improve.

Hurt people hurt people. Trying to hurt ends with me.

Just seems appropriate at the moment.

“To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,
To the last syllable of recorded time;
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player,
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage,
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.”
― William Shakespeare, Macbeth

It is amazing how such little things as the Pope’s encyclical can disquiet me so. I suspect the fact I have just lost my father-in-law, and now my paternal grandmother, is more of the cause of the disquiet.

Behold, you have made my days a few handbreadths, and my lifetime is as nothing before you. Surely all mankind stands as a mere breath! Selah

I waste away; I will not live forever. Leave me alone, for my days are but a breath.

For they are like a breath of air; their days are like a passing shadow.

Yet you do not know what your life will be like tomorrow. You are just a vapor that appears for a little while and then vanishes away.


Willis’ article is well presented and insightful. The comments, particularly those of RGB, are quite valuable. Some of the comments are good examples of what not to do. Some are educational and valuable.

Willis and RGB contribute greatly to WUWT, and they are among the greatest minds of our time. If you research the site, with the built-in search or your favorite search engine, you will find a wealth of knowledge and insight.

You will understand the global climate better if you read this article and the comments. The time spent reading will prove worthwhile.

While RGB points out that CO2 physically acts to increase global average surface temperature, Willis shows (in this and prior articles) that CO2 is not the only factor, and as RGB points out, more heat doesn’t necessarily mean hotter; it can instead mean faster, or slightly larger dissipative emergent phenomena.

Carbon dioxide is an essential ingredient in life. We must have it, and it has been deficient in the environment throughout human existence. It is likely still deficient. CO2 is no more a pollutant than O2 and H2O. Oxygen is a killer. Water, even more so. We humans suffer more expense and direct tragedy already, directly due to these other two essential ingredients of life than any plausible scenario associated with CO2.

We will burn all of the fossil fuels unless a genius breakthrough occurs. We will run out of all of it before CO2 even begins to become a true concern to the well being of humans and the biosphere.

Mostly, I agree with RGB (and Willis routinely expresses full solidarity with this sentiment) when he says that climate related policies, and even the vast sums spent on climate research are harmful to the least among us. The Pope wants us to respect the poor. That starts not with only small kindnesses, but with cheap energy by every means available.

RGB is correct when he says:
“At heart, all poverty is energy poverty. The units of energy are the units of work, and work, one way or another, is wealth.”

http://www.phy.duke.edu/~rgb/

Watts Up With That?

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach

I got to thinking about how I could gain more understanding of the daily air temperature cycles in the tropics. I decided to look at what happens when the early morning (midnight to 5:00 AM) of a given day is cooler than usual, versus what happens when the early morning is warmer than usual. So what was I expecting to find?

Well, my hypothesis is that due to the emergence of clouds and thunderstorms, when the morning is cooler than usual, there will be less clouds and thunderstorms. As a result the day will tend to warm up, and by the following midnight it will end up warmer than where it started. And when the morning is warmer than usual, increased clouds and thunderstorms will cool the day down, and by the following midnight it will end up cooler than when it started. In other…

View original post 1,665 more words

From the JFK Presidential Library, http://www.jfklibrary.org/Research/Research-Aids/JFK-Speeches/Independence-Day-Oration_1946.aspx.

This speech was delivered by a man of faith.

At the beginning of his political career, it is hard to believe he had a speech-writer. What little I can check, it does appear he is the author.

The speech could easily deliver at any conservative rally, delivered by any of the Right’s rising stars, rousing the crowd to their feet with maybe only one or two exceptions.

What does it say that John Fitzgerald Kennedy was right of most Republicans of our day? What does it say that our current President is one of the Collectivists that JFK decries?

The then Congressional candidate delivered his speech extolling four elements of the American Character. (Apparently delivered in Boston.)

It is all quite worth reading. It all sounds as though it could have been written yesterday, with only the war references updated.

This part is particularly worth repeating:

INDIVIDUALISTIC ELEMENT

The American character has been not only religious, idealistic, and patriotic, but because of these it has been essentially individual.

The right of the individual against the State has ever been one of our most cherished political principles.

The American Constitution has set down for all men to see the essentially Christian and American principle that there are certain rights held by every man which no government and no majority, however powerful, can deny.

Conceived in Grecian thought, strengthened by Christian morality, and stamped indelibly into American political philosophy, the right of the individual against the State is the keystone of our Constitution. Each man is free.

He is free in thought.

He is free in expression.

He is free in worship.

To us, who have been reared in the American tradition, these rights have become part of our very being. They have become so much a part of our being that most of us are prone to feel that they are rights universally recognized and universally exercised. But the sad fact is that this is not true. They were dearly won for us only a few short centuries ago and they were dearly preserved for us in the days just past. And there are large sections of the world today where these rights are denied as a matter of philosophy and as a matter of government.

We cannot assume that the struggle is ended. It is never-ending.

Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty. It was the price yesterday. It is the price today, and it will ever be the price.

The characteristics of the American people have ever been a deep sense of religion, a deep sense of idealism, a deep sense of patriotism, and a deep sense of individualism.

Let us not blink the fact that the days which lie ahead of us are bitter ones.

May God grant that, at some distant date, on this day, and on this platform, the orator may be able to say that these are still the great qualities of the American character and that they have prevailed.

Let us repeat with the orator his closing prayer:

Let us not blink the fact that the days which lie ahead of us are bitter ones.

May God grant that, at some distant date, on this day, and on this platform, the orator may be able to say that these are still the great qualities of the American character and that they have prevailed.

For Christians above all men are forbidden to correct the stumblings of sinners by force … it is necessary to make a man better not by force but by persuasion. We neither have authority granted us by law to restrain sinners, nor, if it were, should we know how to use it, since God gives the crown to those who are kept from evil, not by force, but by choice.

Six Books on the Priesthood  |  http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08452b.htm

I suppose that a good translation. I have doubts about persuasion. It is, for the most part, an illusion.

We must live the best we can. We must set the best example we can. We must argue as reasonably as we can. Only God, however, can change a heart; even only God can change a mind.

Keep both open to God and continuously change for the better.

Also,
“For it is not possible for anyone to cure a man by compulsion against his will.”

 

“Man exists for his own sake and not to add a laborer to the State.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson  

That is a universal statement.

It applies to every human being ever, regardless of age or any other consideration that can be quantified. I exist for me, not you. Not the collective in any way. The same applies for children, students. No child exists as a retirement plan for you, nor a career ready worker for the Chamber of Commerce or any government agency. I am responsible for me. You are not. The state is not. Treat one another fairly, in accord with the golden rule.

Respect.

What is mine is mine, and what is your is yours. If we want to share or trade, so be it. If not, let it be.

“I think it’s much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers which might be wrong.” Richard Feynman

From Facebook:

One of my favorite founding fathers, Samuel Adams, wrote the following in the Boston Gazette in October 1772. It could have been written in any major newspaper in our nation July 2014: “Is it not High Time for the People of this Country explicitly to declare, whether they will be Freemen or Slaves? It is an important Question which ought to be decided. It concerns us more than any Thing in this Life. The Salvation of our Souls is interested in the Event: For wherever Tyranny is establish’d, Immorality of every Kind comes on like a Torrent. It is in the interest of Tyrants to reduce the people to Ignorance and Vice. For they cannot live in any Country where Virtue and Knowledge prevail. The Religion and public Liberty of a People are intimately connected; their Interests are interwoven, they cannot subsist separately; and therefore they rise and fall together. For this Reason, it is always observable, that those who are combined to destroy the People’s Liberties, practice every Art to poison their Morals. How greatly then does it concern us, at all Events, to put a Stop to the Progress of Tyranny.”
From the book, Samuel Adams A Life by Ira Stoll

I confirmed the reference from The Life and Public Services of Samuel Adams
By William Wells, which I found on Google Books. The excerpt is much longer there. Google book reference, assuming it works.

http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Samuel_Adams

“Neither the wisest constitution nor the wisest laws will secure the liberty and happiness of a people whose manners are universally corrupt. He therefore is the truest friend to the liberty of his country who tries most to promote its virtue, and who, so far as his power and influence extend, will not suffer a man to be chosen into any office of power and trust who is not a wise and virtuous man. We must not conclude merely upon a man’s haranguing upon liberty, and using the charming sound, that he is fit to be trusted with the liberties of his country. It is not unfrequent to hear men declaim loudly upon liberty, who, if we may judge by the whole tenor of their actions, mean nothing else by it but their own liberty, — to oppress without control or the restraint of laws all who are poorer or weaker than themselves. It is not, I say, unfrequent to see such instances, though at the same time I esteem it a justice due to my country to say that it is not without shining examples of the contrary kind;”

I’m glad we had such a man speaking for us back then. We need more like him now.

At a very young age, her mother told her: “Something bad happened to me. A very bad man hurt me, but God gave me you.”
Miss Pennsylvania Valerie Gatto, 24, who will compete for the Miss USA 2014

 

Psalm 127:3

Behold, children are a gift of the LORD, The fruit of the womb is a reward.

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