Archives for posts with tag: love

Greetings Brother and sister,

I know not if you will ever actually see this note yourself, but I must try.

I have written before asking you to oppose the war on drugs (oppose all war for that matter). I ask again.

I’m becoming aware of the truths expounded by René Girard. We cannot do unto others first. We must love our neighbor as ourselves.

This is the truth. We must learn to walk in love. We must turn the other cheek. Otherwise, we all die. Continuing to escalate violence is the only feasible way to extinct ourselves. Let’s not.

I trust you still hold your faith honestly, but if you will listen to the above hour, and you can still scapegoat our brethren and throw them in rape cages, I trust your heart will convict you, and you will repent in fasting and mourning until your heart changes.

https://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/193536.Ren_Girard

Brother and sister, can you live the example of following Jesus in His victimhood? Can we end the violence in our own lives each time it invites us to escalate? Can we undo what the adversary is doing? https://www.biblehub.com/1_john/3-8.htm

Be God manifest on earth.

Can we forgive so thoroughly that we value the life of the condemned as our own?

Can we seek restoration rather than punishment? Can we lift people up rather than scapegoat them?

Lawrence Reed, quoting Tocqueville,
“Even despots accept the excellence of liberty. The simple truth is that they wish to keep it for themselves and promote the idea that no one else is at all worthy of it. Thus, our opinion of liberty does not reveal our differences but the relative value which we place on our fellow man. We can state with conviction, therefore, that a man’s support for absolute government is in direct proportion to the contempt he feels for his country” — Alexis de Tocqueville, 1858.
Don’t you agree?
 
“Thus, our opinion of liberty does not reveal our differences but the relative value which we place on our fellow man.”
 
Isn’t it that simple?
 
“We can state with conviction, therefore, that a man’s support for absolute government is in direct proportion to the contempt he feels for his country””
 
Yes! The less willing you are to let your fellow citizens alone, the more you contempt you have for them and the more you distrust the people of your country.
 
Like Thomas Jefferson said, “I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.”
 
Forcing people by forcing the armed police to force them leads to all kinds of troubles, all kinds of harm. While it is inconvenient to trust people, since they will so often fail, it does show our love, respect, and patriotism.
 
It is worth it.
Liberty is worth the effort. Every person is worth it, every single person on earth, born or unborn, native or immigrant, legal or otherwise, wise or foolish, healthy or infirm, rich or poor, talented or plain, gifted or needy, yes, every single person!
Mr. Reed ends his statement with the following:
See Jim Powell’s essay, “Alexis de Tocqueville: How People Gain Liberty and Lose It” here: http://bit.ly/211zP8I. Tocqueville warned that a welfare state could seduce people into servitude.

My daughter, a new third-grade teacher, posted the following post by Mrs. Iseminger.

http://petalsofjoy.org/?p=940

My daughter thought it the most important statement she’d seen in a long time.

I’m sure she appreciated the opening line. It is something I can see her doing exactly. Of course, the main points are what she was sharing.

To the point, Mrs. Iseminger implores us to love the children. She says:

“Students in our schools are broken. They’re broken pieces from broken backgrounds. Eyes hollow, wondering how to glue and stitch themselves back together realizing Elmer’s can’t fix their problems.

“Ask teachers who love their students. Our hearts ache to touch the ripped places in their souls. To help them understand they’re a treasure. To show them they matter. But we don’t always have the tape and the glue and the patch-kits they need.”

It isn’t so much that they schools are broken (they are), but that so many of the children are broken. We focus too much on trying to make good students and good schools for the students while we forget they are just people. We need to help them be the best people they can be, not prepare them to be the Borg drones that provide for us in our old age.

It so happens that if we love, honor, respect, and care for our young ones, they will reciprocate when we are old. At least, they will if we help them learn what is important by demonstrating it, and I ain’t referring to the three Rs.

Mrs. Iseminger says, “Our schools need you to fight for our students. Not with policies and procedures, rules and regulation. No. We need you to fight with love.

Heavy emphasis on love. Not mushy love. Not love that spoils, but tough love that never forgets that we share the same road, the same failings, the same hopes, and mostly the same goals. Love that gives. Love that demands only an honest effort, never something in return. The love Jesus said was the greatest, that we lay down our life for our friend. It has been said that it is not that hard to die for someone, but it is hard to live for someone. Some people do. Some people must, and they meet the challenge admirably.

Mrs. Iseminger continues:

“Common Core. Parcc. NCLB. CLAST. Race to the Top. SAT. ACT. End of Course Exams. Teacher Evaluations. Standards. C2Ready?

Not a single one of these policies or tests or acronyms begin to touch the deepest needs of our schools today because our schools have fragmented students who continue to attempt learning in the midst of destitution and dysfunction.

Our students are in a fight and they need you to fight with them. Fight for them.

It’s not a fight to elevate standards. It’s not a fight to send every American boy and girl to college. It’s not a fight to raise internationally competitive test scores.”

We need to get over our false sense of patriotism. George Bernard Shaw said, patriotism is your conviction that this country is superior to all other countries because you were born in it. But President Calvin Coolidge said, “Patriotism is easy to understand…. It means looking out for yourself by looking out for your country.”

If we are stuck on the first, we think we are noble when we assert we have to prepare our children to compete on a global stage. If we find our way into the latter, we realize that kind of preparation and competition isn’t what we want at all. Read the rest of this entry »

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