Archives for posts with tag: respect
I’m not going to explain any of my own history, but I identify fully, exactly, with Jordan Peterson. #jordanbpeterson @jordanbpeterson
Also with Lindsey Shepard.
My views don’t align well with any group I know of. I suspect Peterson would say the same of himself, except maybe for some of his fellow clinical psychiatrists.
 
If he happens to see this, I encourage him to stay strong and to focus on doing what is right. Stay faithful to your heart, your convictions, and the truth as best you can see it.
 
I stand pragmatically. I stand for all I know of history and science, and for realizing what can work, and what cannot.
 
Freedom is the only thing that can work.
 
Coercion is evil, always.
 
Stand for everyone, every group, every segment, no matter their differences, no matter their color, no matter their age, no matter their politics, no matter their religion, no matter their nationality, no matter their conformity. Stand for the individual! Stand for free exercise of conscience.
I support Peterson in his stand against using public education as indoctrination. https://youtu.be/s0EuQe6BOWo
I stand for the abolition of coercive, compulsory education laws.
There are many things that need fixed in education, including basic civility, respect, and freedom in all regards, but none of it matters while we officially coerce parents to force their children to conformity. Public education fails because its only true goal is to make conforming drones, compliant to the political will of the dominant faction.
We are free people, free individuals. It is fundamental. Everywhere freedom is suppressed, every time people resist, and resistance is not futile.
Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combinations

My wife and my sons were able to go to Hidden Figures tonight.

Go see this movie!

Excellent movie. I figure they played a bit fast and loose with the factual history, but I think they got what it meant. I think they portrayed the meaning right. Perhaps some day I will try to figure out the historical details. Regardless, the movie makes the main point quite well.

One of the important aspects was encapsulated in a clip of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. explaining that the civil rights movement aimed to save the American soul. We are still working to accomplish it, and we will get to the promised land.

We, each of us, individually, must face every person as unique and worthwhile. We each must resolve to never allow such prejudice as depicted in the movie to arise again, and we must work it every day because it isn’t gone.

I resolve to live giving every person the benefit of the doubt. I have always tried to live that way, and this movie redoubles my resolve. We must judge every individual only by the content of his character (or her character, character knows no male nor female, no gender at all). We must judge only character, ever supposing the best until proven the less. We must always give each other the benefit of the doubt.

Aside from being a good backstory for the early space history, the movie treats well the basics of life.

We all mostly just want to get along. We all have our dreams and aspirations. We should be able to pursue our aims without restrictions imposed by prejudice.

The movie captures a lot of the emotion of the routine as well as the extraordinary. We all know the results of the early manned flights, but no one knew as each occurred. The movie captures some of that quite well, at least it did for me. It also captured some of those little things, the personal things, the basics of life and love.

Determination is well portrayed as well.

Overall, quite a good movie with a message we all must remember and take to heart in every interaction we have with one another.

Each of us must be mindful that we are all in this together. For nearly all of us want the exact same things, chief of which are the love of family and friends, and the satisfaction of an honorably lived life with work well done.

I enjoyed the movie, and I learned. I expect most everyone else will too.

“I do not pretend to understand the moral universe; the arc is a long one, my eye reaches but little ways; I cannot calculate the curve and complete the figure by the experience of sight; I can divine it by conscience. And from what I see I am sure it bends towards justice.” Theodore Parker

Of course, those words inspired Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. decades later to say, “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”

Each of us is personally responsible to help the bend toward justice, liberty, respect, and genuine love. No matter how far we ever manage to reach out into the stars, we must take these truths with us and live them.

 

 

In chapter seven, Dr. Stark addresses how the Christian faith appealed to women, and how that combined with related factors to increase the proportion of the population that was Christian.

It is popular in our times to badmouth the Church with regard to women. However, Christianity is almost singularly responsible for elevating women from chattel. Sure, there is much room for improvement, but women were hardly anything in most regards in most circumstances until Christianity started taking hold and changing hearts within society.

Women were given in marriage, usually without their own say, at almost any age. Men could force the wife to abort, or worse; he could simply expose the child, especially if the child were female. That, of course, means infanticide. The parents, specifically the father, could simply take the infant outdoors and leave her. Men could divorce wives for most any reason.

Women were expected to be chaste, but there was a double standard for men. A man tended to sleep with his wife to have a child, but he sought out prostitutes for most of his sex.

Christianity would not sanction such.

There is still a long way to go in society, but things are better. Of course, there is a long way to go both outside the church and within.

Things were bad generally compared to today, but they were especially bad for women. Christianity started changing that, and many women became Christian because of it.

The church needs to ensure it maintains the highest regard for women. With our documentation of history as it is now, I believe it is unreasonable for churches to prohibit women from any offices in the church. We need to hold to the standard of neither male nor female, nor any other external distinction. A faithful and capable servant must be honored as such and accorded appropriate position and authority.

Dr. Stark emphasizes compassion and integrity as keys to the growth of Christianity. We need to diligently ensure we stay true to the dignity of all and to the integrity of each of us individually.

Lawrence Reed, quoting Tocqueville,
“Even despots accept the excellence of liberty. The simple truth is that they wish to keep it for themselves and promote the idea that no one else is at all worthy of it. Thus, our opinion of liberty does not reveal our differences but the relative value which we place on our fellow man. We can state with conviction, therefore, that a man’s support for absolute government is in direct proportion to the contempt he feels for his country” — Alexis de Tocqueville, 1858.
Don’t you agree?
 
“Thus, our opinion of liberty does not reveal our differences but the relative value which we place on our fellow man.”
 
Isn’t it that simple?
 
“We can state with conviction, therefore, that a man’s support for absolute government is in direct proportion to the contempt he feels for his country””
 
Yes! The less willing you are to let your fellow citizens alone, the more you contempt you have for them and the more you distrust the people of your country.
 
Like Thomas Jefferson said, “I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.”
 
Forcing people by forcing the armed police to force them leads to all kinds of troubles, all kinds of harm. While it is inconvenient to trust people, since they will so often fail, it does show our love, respect, and patriotism.
 
It is worth it.
Liberty is worth the effort. Every person is worth it, every single person on earth, born or unborn, native or immigrant, legal or otherwise, wise or foolish, healthy or infirm, rich or poor, talented or plain, gifted or needy, yes, every single person!
Mr. Reed ends his statement with the following:
See Jim Powell’s essay, “Alexis de Tocqueville: How People Gain Liberty and Lose It” here: http://bit.ly/211zP8I. Tocqueville warned that a welfare state could seduce people into servitude.
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